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Archive - Oct 13, 2020

ASHG 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting to Showcase Innovative Research in Human Genetics (October 27-30)

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting taking place October 27-30 will showcase global advances in human genetics and genomics research that are transforming the scientific landscape and leading to new advances in the treatment of devastating diseases. The ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting (https://www.ashg.org/meetings/2020meeting/) will feature more than 200 oral presentations, nearly 2,000 scientific poster presentations, 80+ exhibit booths, networking and professional development opportunities, and more, making it the digital epicenter of human genetics. As always, it will be among the world’s largest events for genetic and genomic discovery, with thousands of scientists, clinicians, advocates, and others participating from more than 50 countries.“As a global showcase of the latest developments in human genetics, the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting will provide an online venue for researchers who conduct human genetics and genomics research around the world to exchange scientific knowledge,” said Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD, ASHG President. “I am excited about the fantastic talks, posters, and special sessions, that will be presented at the Virtual Meeting.” The meeting will host chat sessions throughout the program to continue scientific conversations and exchanges around the latest scientific updates and breakthroughs. The Society will also recognize the outstanding scientific achievements of its members in the human genetics and genomics community with special awards and lectures throughout the meeting. Not only will the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting host exceptional plenaries, but also concurrent programming sessions covering critical areas of the field.

Simple Sugar (N-Acetylglucosamine) May Be Possible Therapy for Repairing Myelin in Multiple Sclerosis, Study in JBC Suggests

N-acetylglucosamine (image), a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine (UCI)-led study. Published online on September25, 2020 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the study also demonstrates that in mice, delivering N-acetylglucosamine orally to lactating mothers drove primary myelination in their nursing offspring. N-acetylglucosamine is a simple sugar that is metabolically attached to proteins at the cell surface to control cellular function. "We found that N-acetylglucosamine activates myelin stem cells to promote primary myelination and myelin repair," said Michael Demetriou, MD, PhD, FRCP(C), Professor of Neurology, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at the UCI School of Medicine and leader of the study. "Our data raises the intriguing possibility that N-acetylglucosamine may be a simple therapy to promote myelin repair in multiple sclerosis patients". Formal human studies will be required to test this theory. The open-access JBC article is titled “N-Acetylglucosamine Drives Myelination by Triggering Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Differentiation.” The failure of robust re-myelination following inflammatory demyelination in multiple sclerosis leads to chronic disability and neurodegeneration. Myelin insulates the long, cable-like nerve cell branches called axons, and serves to increase the speed of electrical signal conduction between neurons. Myelination in the central nervous system also plays an important role in cognitive development during childhood.