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Archive - Jul 6, 2019

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Triplet-Targeted Therapy Improves Survival for Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer and BRAF Mutations; Phase III Trial Results May Change Standard of Care for Up to 15% of Colorectal Cancer Patients

The three-drug combination of encorafenib, binimetinib, and cetuximab significantly improved overall survival (OS) in patients with BRAF-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), according to results of the BEACON CRC Phase III clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Texas (UT) MD Anderson Cancer Center. The treatment combination resulted in a median OS of 9 months for the combination therapy compared to 5.4 months for current standard-of-care treatment. Objective response rate (ORR) for the triplet-targeted therapy was 26 percent compared to just two percent for standard therapy. BEACON CRC is the first and only Phase III trial designed to test BRAF/MEK combination targeted therapies in patients with mCRC and the BRAF V600E mutation. BRAF mutations are estimated to occur in up to 15 percent of patients with mCRC, with V600E being the most common BRAF mutation and representing a poor prognosis for these patients. The trial results was reported on July 6at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2019 (https://www.esmo.org/Conferences/ESMO-World-GI-2019) in Barcelona, Spain, by principal investigator Scott Kopetz, MD, Associate Professor of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology at MD Anderson. The title of the report abstract is BEACON CRC: a randomized, 3-Arm, phase 3 study of encorafenib and cetuximab with or without binimetinib vs. choice of either irinotecan or FOLFIRI plus cetuximab in BRAF V600E–mutant metastatic colorectal cancer. "This study builds on a decade of research into the tumor biology of BRAF-mutated colorectal cancer, and reflects a rationale combination to address the vulnerabilities unique to this tumor," said Dr. Kopetz.

Strain of Oncolytic Common Cold Virus (Coxsackievirus A21) Could Revolutionize Treatment of Bladder Cancer

A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect, and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study published online on July 4, 2019 in Clinical Cancer Research reports. No trace of the cancer was found in one patient following treatment with the virus. In the majority of the other 14 treated patients, evidence of cancer cell death was observed. The title of the article is “Viral Targeting of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer and Priming of Anti-Tumour Immunity Following Intravesical Coxsackievirus A21.” Researchers from the University of Surrey and Royal Surrey County Hospital investigated the safety and tolerability of exposure to the oncolytic (“cancer-killing”) virus coxsackievirus (CVA21), a naturally occurring strain of the common cold virus, in fifteen patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). NMIBC is found in the tissue of the inner surface of the bladder and is the tenth most common cancer in the UK with approximately 10,000 people each year diagnosed with the illness. Current treatments for this cancer are problematic. Transurethral resection, an invasive procedure that removes all visible lesions, has a high tumor recurrence rate ranging from 50 per cent to 70 per cent as well as a high tumor progression rate between 10 per cent and 20 per cent over a period of two to five years. Another common course of treatment, immunotherapy with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), a live bacterium used to treat bladder cancer, has been found to have serious side effects in one third of NMIBC patients, while one third do not respond to the treatment at all. During this pioneering study, fifteen NMIBC patients, one week prior to pre-scheduled surgery to remove their tumors, received CVA21 via a catheter in the bladder.